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9 thoughts on “ Whose?

  1. You use a noun phrase containing whose /huːz/ at the beginning of a relative clause to show who or what something belongs to or is connected with. Whose is used in both defining and non-defining clauses. A noun phrase containing whose can be the subject or object of a verb, or the object of a preposition.
  2. Whose is a possessive pronounthat you should use when you’re asking or telling whom something belongs to. Who’s is a contractionmade up of the words “who” and “is” or “who” and “has”. The Roots of Whose vs Who’s: Who and Whom.
  3. whose adj adjective: Describes a noun or pronoun--for example, "a tall girl," "an interesting book," "a big house." (possessive of who) de quién loc adj locución adjetiva: Unidad léxica estable formada de dos o más palabras que funciona como adjetivo ("de fácil manejo", "a contraluz", "de fiar").
  4. whose adj adjective: Describes a noun or pronoun--for example, "a tall girl," "an interesting book," "a big house." (possessive of which) dont pron pronom: remplace un nom: Ex: "Il a pris le gâteau et l'a mangé." "Je vous ai vu hier au supermarché.".
  5. Who or Whom? Amber, Igor, and Miss Hamrick dreamed up that and which when they wanted to refer to inanimate objects and abstractions. But they also dreamed up a set of relative pronouns (who, whoever, whom, whomever, whose) to refer to people. These words exhibit the condition of case, which you’ve already mastered.
  6. The following is a mini-tutorial on the uses of "who," "whom," and "whose." If you already know how to use these words, you can skip the explanation and go directly to the exercises.
  7. Whose definition, (the possessive case of who used as an adjective): Whose umbrella did I take? Whose is this one? See more.
  8. Aug 07,  · Whose definition: You use whose at the beginning of a relative clause where you mention something that | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples.
  9. Whose is the possessive form of “who.” Normally, possession is shown by an apostrophe “s,” but not with this form. The good news is that this function is the only role “whose” can play in a sentence. Stacy, whose mother works at the café downtown, is learning to bake cinnamon rolls to sell there.

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